25,000 78 RPM Records for Your Listening Pleasure

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A few years ago I spent time preparing my grandparents’ home to be sold. In the process my uncles and I came across many artifacts of a bygone era in American culture. Included in those artifacts were some 78RPM records. Unfortunately, lacking a record player we weren’t able to play the records. But today there is a good chance that the music on those records can be heard through the Internet Archive.

Today, through Open Culture, I learned that the Internet Archive hosts a collection of digitized recordings from more than 25,000 78 RPM records. You can search, browse, and listen to everything in the collection made possible through The Great 78 Project. The recordings can be downloaded, streamed, and embedded into blog posts as I have done below.

Applications for Education

This collection could be a great resource for music teachers who are looking for samples to use in music appreciation lessons or courses like the History of Jazz course that I enjoyed as an undergrad.

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This post originally appeared on Free Technology for Teachers

if you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission.

5 New Google Forms Features

Earlier today Google announced the release of five new features for Google Forms users. Four of the five new features are significant for most users. 

The first update to Google Forms to note is a new response format option. A new “checkbox grid” response format lets you create questions that require multiple responses. For example, you can ask people to pick a day from a list of choices then choose a time from a list of choices. 

The second update that stood out to me is an improved file upload option. Google Forms can now accept file uploads as responses from respondents outside of your domain. For a while now you have been able to create questions to which respondents upload a file as a response. That option was previously limited to only accepting files from people who had a G Suite account in the same domain as you. (The caveat to this being that your domain and the respondent’s domain both allow cross-domain sharing). 

The third update of note is a new option to choose your own default settings for new Forms that you create. This means that you could set default point values for quiz questions on every Form that you create. 

A new response validation option is the fourth update that some teachers will appreciate. Google is calling this feature “intelligent response validation.” This means that if you ask a question like “what is your email address?” and the response isn’t a properly formatted email address, the Form will prompt respondents to correct the submission. 

Finally, there is a new option to move entire sections of a Form through a simple drag-and-drop. This works the same way as reordering individual questions. 

It’s important to note that it could take a few weeks for all of these new features to appear in your G Suite for Education domain. 

online PD this summer

This post originally appeared on Free Technology for Teachers

if you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission.

Short Lessons About Fireworks

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Over the weekend fireworks starting popping around my house. To my dog the sounds of fireworks are the sounds of the sky falling. To many people the sounds of fireworks is the sound of summer and celebration.

If you or your children are wondering how the fireworks actually work, take a look at the following videos from National Geographic and Discovery News.

Both of these videos could be the basis of a flipped science lesson. In this post I provided an overview of how to use five services to create flipped video lessons.

online PD this summer

This post originally appeared on Free Technology for Teachers

if you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission.

An Interactive Display of the Declaration of Independence

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The Digital Declaration of Independence is a fantastic website on which students can learn about the Declaration of Independence and the men who signed it. The Digital Declaration of Independence is an interactive display of John Trumbull’s painting Declaration of Independence, a scan of the text of the Declaration of Independence, and a map of the hometowns of the signers of the Declaration of Independence.

When viewing the Digital Declaration of Independence you will see that each person’s head has been highlighted. Click on a highlighted head to be taken to that person’s name, to see that person’s hometown on the map, and to view a short biography of the person.

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Applications for Education

The Digital Declaration of Independence could be a good reference for students to learn about some of the men who signed the Declaration of Independence. Aside from that, the Digital Declaration of Independence is a great model of what can be done with the Neatline mapping and timeline tool.

online PD this summer

This post originally appeared on Free Technology for Teachers

if you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission.

How to Use Speech-to-Text in Gmail

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In Sunday’s Practical Ed Tech Tip of the Week I mentioned a Chrome extension that you can use to dictate messages in Gmail. That extension is called Email Dictation. With the extension installed you can quickly have your spoke words appear as text in a Gmail message. In the video below I give a short demonstration of how to use Email Dictation.

online PD this summer

This post originally appeared on Free Technology for Teachers

if you see it elsewhere, it has been used without permission.